All Quiet on the Western Front | Official Trailer | Netflix

All Quiet on the Western Front | Official Trailer | Netflix

All Quiet on the Western Front tells the gripping story of a young German soldier on the Western Front of World War I. Paul and his comrades experience first-hand how the initial euphoria of war turns into desperation and fear as they fight for their lives, and each other, in the trenches. The film from director Edward Berger is based on the world renowned bestseller of the same name by Erich Maria Remarque.

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All Quiet on the Western Front | Official Trailer | Netflix
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When 17-year-old Paul joins the Western Front in World War I, his initial excitement is soon shattered by the grim reality of life in the trenches.

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28 Responses

  1. Brandt G says:

    I haven’t been this excited about a Netflix original in a long time. All Quiet on the Western Front is one of my all-time favorite novels, I re-read it every year or two. Beautifully haunting.

    • Sidrianico Burgos says:

      @Necro morph Nice try

    • Brandt G says:

      @Tîwaz I will definitely check out The Storm of Steel. Remarque was injured very early on in his military service and largely used the experiences of other injured soldiers in the medbay to inspire the characters and events in All Quiet. The novel was clearly anti-war. I’m looking forward to reading Juger’s work partially BECAUSE it was written with the German nationalist sentiment in mind. After all, that nationalist rhetoric (among other factors such as social pressure) caused young soldiers to join the service in the first place. Plus, viewing the war from both perspectives is important to truly understand the different mindsets of the German soldiers, bunching them into one philosophical camp isn’t all that useful in understanding history as it actually happened. Thank you for the recommendation!

    • Ninz says:

      @John bro not all beauty is celebratory, beauty can be terrifying and horrific if those realities are shown in a way that doesn’t just capture them, but brings them into perspective. beauty is art, which is what the book and movies are in one of the truest senses of the word.

    • Karl Karlos says:

      @Adam Mooberry Stop talking Gibberish.

  2. S Margrave says:

    My grandfather fought in the trenches in WW1. He had just finished college when he was called up, he was due to a get a job in engineering but after fighting in the war, he decided to become a doctor. He had said that he felt helpless when his comrades got injured and died on the battlefield so he dedicated the rest of his life to helping others who were injured or ill. Unfortunately he didn‘t get to live as long as he wanted since he was exposed to mustard gas. Because he became a doctor, he knew how he‘d die. He‘d died 5 decades after fighting. Its really nice to see films and books about WW1, WW2 wasn‘t the only brutal war. An entire generation was lost and forever changed because of WW1.

  3. Xavier says:

    *I’m glad WWI is getting more and more recognition, especially showing the German perspective, both sides suffered the brutality of trench warfare, both of them were young adults that witnessed hell* !!

  4. Galactic Banana Stop motions says:

    I finished reading the book a few weeks ago and I have to say it was the most tragic and profound story I’ve ever read. It paints such vivid and terrifying images in my mind that no other book has done. Hearing the screams of wounded horses tangled in their own spilt intestines until they are put down. Feeling the bleak and dreary grey of the lorries. And finally the dark sky of the front lit up with bright red and green flares and star shells. God that book really paints insanely vivid images that I’ve been illustrating my own interpretations recently.

    • Galactic Banana Stop motions says:

      @Dostav I really hope the movie represents the physiological aspects of the book. Because to me one of the best parts was seeing how their entire worldview changes, and how it affects them mentally. As someone diagnosed with ptsd myself(not from anything near as horrible as this tho) it really hit home with the part where Paul goes on leave. It’s like after you’ve seen some shit you really can never see things the same again, like losing all innocence. The book is a slow, and for the most part monotonous and depressing ride, but that’s what made it such a great story, it didn’t sugercoat anything and didn’t pull any punches.

    • CV Z says:

      Read “The Forgotten Soldier” by Guy Sajer

    • Dostav says:

      That’s why I feel like the trailer isn’t capturing that at all, it somewhat epic, while this whole book was slow and gray tragedy. Maybe it’s adaptation won’t be that good at all

    • A P says:

      Erich Maria Remarque is in a very special category when it comes to depicting the tragedy of human condition. Try reading “The Triumph Arc” and “Three Friends”. The sense of dread is always palpable, even when there seem to be streaks of light on any given page. Watching the world tear itself apart now is so shocking as someone who was a child when we moved to the U.S. from former USSR. People will never learn.

  5. julylafallo says:

    A truly heart-breaking story! I watched it on the big screen and this was a breathtaking experience. Haven’t seen such a powerful German movie in a while. I truly feel that this does the novel justice.

  6. NETFLIX LOVING says:

    *I’m glad WWI is getting more and more recognition, especially showing the German perspective, both sides suffered the brutality of trench warfare, both of them were young adults that witnessed hell!!*

  7. Xavier says:

    A truly heart-breaking story! I watched it on the big screen and this was a breathtaking experience. Haven’t seen such a powerful German movie in a while. I truly feel that this does the novel justice.

  8. Larva Tuba Show says:

    I’m glad WWI is getting more and more recognition, especially showing the German perspective, both sides suffered the brutality of trench warfare, both of them were young adults that witnessed hell!!

  9. Faith H. says:

    I remember reading a book about this in my sophomore year of high school… It’s truly heartbreaking to those people who lost their lives fighting, especially if they were barely an adult. Back then the motto was basically if you’re fit to fight, no matter if you’re 16 or 50 years old, they would draft you anyway. Can’t wait to watch this movie

  10. Xavier says:

    World War 1 was probably the most depressing war to fight in. Being stuck in trenches for months, thousands dying for just yards and losing gained ground from counterattacks,and fighting and dying on mud.

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