How the World’s Wealthiest People Travel

How the World’s Wealthiest People Travel

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Writing by Sam Denby and Tristan Purdy
Editing by Alexander Williard
Animation led by Josh Sherrington
Sound by Graham Haerther
Thumbnail by Simon Buckmaster

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43 Responses

  1. lopypop says:

    This video reminded me of a book called “The Velvet Rope Economy.” It details how businesses from Disney World to Healthcare have changed their models to squeeze as much money out of the wealthy as possible while reducing quality of service for the vast majority of customers.

    • Are Dub says:

      @ccdecker have you ever flown first class, even domestic? when you sit there sipping champagne as the cattle walks past you. mmmm.

    • jokedog says:

      @ccdecker Ok you twisted my arm. I’ve been on the fence b/c I couldn’t find a good way to justify paying triple the admission to feel like a VIP. Question, how many lines did u skip in total? If 10, then its like paying $30 ride?

    • ai is a great place to work for me currently and I says:

      @planetsector9 amen 🙏 if you’re f2p like me, its next to impossible to compete against whales

    • R T says:

      Sounds like a government.

  2. Abbreviated Reviews says:

    I had no idea that rich people boated their boats to new boat spots.

    Of course, the “growth” of these industries is significant at the scales they currently exist, but not at scales that would benefit anyone but the people working directly within them.

    • Trusty Shellback says:

      @Jason Reed I’ve been working on large cargo ships for a little over 10 years now as a navigator. Ocean storms can get gnarly even for large cargo ships and it’s not uncommon to change routes for bad storms. But as “Jason S” said, it’s probably more about the cost. Large ships burn less fuel per ton-mile compared to smaller boats, so a large ship carrying yachts will burn less fuel than all the yachts all sailing on their own. Also, they probably save on the cost of manning the voyage and insurance for the crew.

    • Jason S says:

      @Jason Reed A lot of these yachts are also way bigger than the wooden ships with sails that crossed the ocean hundreds of years ago. Part of it is probably cost since you would have to pay for a crew and fuel to go across, plus I’m not sure how sturdy some of the fittings inside the yacht are. All their stuff might get tossed in 9ft seas and it would cost even more to repair everything.

      Still it’s like they have a yacht, but they never actually sail on them. They are just expensive buildings on the water that they can show off.

    • Jason Reed says:

      While i understand the concept that since some boats aren’t capable of crossing the ocean on their own power, the idea of a ship carrying other ocean worthy boats is still hilarious.

      Its just I’m used to the 20ft range of boats being considered unworthy of the open ocean, not something called a super yacht being unworthy of the ocean.

    • Kali Yuga says:

      Capitlaism??

  3. EliTheGleason says:

    Literally having a boat haul your boat to the boating convention so you can all go inside a building and think about how people are admiring your boat

    • Khorneflakes says:

      @Michael Murdock No, many boats wich can do the trip on their own will be shuttled, because most of the times its cheaper to do so. They all have professionell crew onboard which is expensive as hell, not even talking about the costs of breakage on the way

    • RWXR says:

      @Michael Murdock Owners almost never do the crossing, at the level you are at a “fully crewed” ship. But yeah, most of the boats shuttled are sail and shorter ranged, or big boats that are due major maintenance and the yard is at the other end of the journey.

    • Michael Murdock says:

      The yachts that get shuttled aren’t “big enough” to cross oceans, either due to fuel range or because their owners aren’t salty enough to stare 40 ft waves in the face from the weather deck, the pansies. It’s the rich person version of people hauling their motorcycle to Sturgis and then riding around the black hills dressed like BDSM pirates.

  4. Xavier says:

    This video reminded me of a book called “The Velvet Rope Economy.” It details how businesses from Disney World to Healthcare have changed their models to squeeze as much money out of the wealthy as possible while reducing quality of service for the vast majority of customers

  5. Flightmode says:

    A ship that carries yachts over water so that the super rich get to attend events they don’t even want to attend, causing prices to skyrocket and carbon emissions to go nuts, while the average middle class person gets criticized for using their heater in August is truly the pinnacle of irony

    • Childer Yeeter 420 says:

      @MrHan get those pitchforks

    • EebstertheGreat says:

      Everyone here saying carrying yachts by ship is efficient are missing the point. Sure, if you need to move dozens of superyachts across the ocean, that’s probably the best way to do it. But we shouldn’t have to move dozens of superyachts across the ocean, especially for the enjoyment of just a few dozen individuals. Because nobody should be able to afford such an extravagant, expensive, over-the-top service. And they especially shouldn’t do it grudgingly over and over again throughout the year out of some sort of perverse obligation to be wasteful.

    • MrHan says:

      It’s time to sharpen those pickaxes. Un-dust those guillotines.

    • Childer Yeeter 420 says:

      I’ll be like yeah ok capitalism kinda works and then see shit like this and just nope

    • Paul S Rohrbaugh says:

      There’s a youtber building a guillotine in his backyard and I think he might be on to something

  6. Xavier says:

    A ship that carries yachts over water so that the super rich get to attend events they don’t even want to attend, causing prices to skyrocket and carbon emissions to go nuts, while the average middle class person gets criticized for using their heater in August is truly the pinnacle of irony

  7. Docishauk says:

    I bought a Costco canoe this summer so you can say I’m part of the ultra-exclusive maritime community

  8. sks2000 says:

    The most dead I ever felt inside was working as a private Jet mechanic. Thanks Wendover for bringing all those old memory’s back to the surface.

    • Iqbal Indaryono says:

      @Occams Chainsaw and how did thay person own that land in the first place? Odds are if it’s an orchard it was given to that person via inheritence. Funny thing about capitalism and inheritence, they contradict each other. In capitalism, once the owner died, their assets are up for grabs to the highest bidder. Capitalism doesn’t hide behind government lobbying in order to survive, either your orchard dies or it lives, there are no subsidies, no bailouts, no nepotism, no favoritism.

      A has 9 apples where B has 1 apple, A has an orchard, B doesn’t. A owns all the land and is willing to sell it for 10 apples for every 1 apples worth of production the land can provide. Is it possible for B to own land? Why of course, B just doesn’t need to eat for several seasons and he’ll earn that piece of land. Here comes I, A’s son, he only needs to wait for A to die to inherit it. And you can be sure that A has trained I and trusted employees to make sure the company survives.

    • Iqbal Indaryono says:

      @Occams Chainsaw because this video is talking about the ultra wealthy? Do you go to a video discussing the poor and spout about the ultra wealthy first? Your argument feels like whataboutism

    • Matrus Doubt says:

      @Occams Chainsaw ok, I see, you need more help: above and below is the y-axes of a graph and besides you (left and right) is the x-axes. You concluded that having nobody above or below you means having nobody besides you. How about aiming for mainly having people besides you on the x-axes?

    • The Rodestarr says:

      @Dead Dinosaur I have the need to take souls.

    • StuffandThings says:

      @Occams Chainsaw Reminds me of the movie “The Platform”

      It really is sad though how nobody looks to those below them. I imagine if everybody did that, then this unthinkable wealth wouldn’t even be an issue in the first place

  9. Bill Kong says:

    What I learned today is that the prices of luxury stuff is not driven by supply and demand they’re a form of gatekeeping to keep the billionaires feeling superior to the peasant millionaires.
    Actually I think that’s true all the way down.

    • Ser Garlan Tyrell says:

      Welcome to Apple’s business model.

    • Big Jared says:

      Yep. Millionaires buy Lambos. Real Money gold plates them.

    • J C says:

      I’d argue there’s also a reason for the gatekeeping. When you have what other people want (or need), you’re a target for a lot of BS that ranges from annoying to dangerous. Imagine being a lottery winner who’s name was in the news. You’d probably wall yourself off really quick.

    • Seva Loginov says:

      @Admiral_Awesome I think it’s more systemic than deliberate.

      I don’t think the rich people specifically want to eliminate the middle class. Middle class has more disposable income to spend, and also is more easily pacified and stable, while still being astronomically far below the level of the ultra rich.

  10. Tommy P. says:

    It’s hard to understand how secretive their hidden mansions are. My family has a small cabin in Michigan. I knew the neighbor had a lot of land but that was about it. A couple years ago the guy dies and the property goes up for sale. 8 million dollars.

    • SrMofo says:

      @CodyCast its simple to get property blurred. Seriously, it’s a couple mouse clicks…. getting it unblurred when you put it up for sale is next to impossible. Ask me how I know.

    • Ser Garlan Tyrell says:

      Lol… That’s not that much. House prices around here have inflated so much since we moved here the average price is like $1m.

    • Sönke Schlüter says:

      @CodyCast blurred out on google maps you say? ….. ever tried googles streetview in germany? A lot of people here demanded that google blurs theyre house, so much in fact that google just said: ah nah not worth the efford

    • CodyCast says:

      I live next to john Cena in a $ neighborhood of San Diego. The dude is ultra secretive. To the point where his house is blurred on Google maps (didn’t know that was possible?

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