Starlink Mission

Starlink Mission

SpaceX is targeting Wednesday, April 7 for launch of 60 Starlink satellites from Space Launch Complex 40 (SLC-40) at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida. The instantaneous window is at 12:34 p.m. EDT, or 16:34 UTC, and a backup opportunity is available on Thursday, April 8 at 12:12 p.m. EDT, or 16:12 UTC.

The Falcon 9 first stage rocket booster supporting this mission previously supported launch of NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley to the International Space Station, ANASIS-II, CRS-21, Transporter-1, and two Starlink missions. Following stage separation, SpaceX will land Falcon 9’s first stage on the “Of Course I Still Love You” droneship, which will be located in the Atlantic Ocean. One half of Falcon 9’s fairing prevouisly supported launch of AMOS-17 and two Starlink missions, and the other previously supported a Starlink mission.

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36 Responses

  1. Starship SN10 says:

    The boosters are becoming so black that those who aren’t familiar with this rocket will think, the first stage of this rocket is painted black.

  2. Kevin Tran says:

    CONGRATS TO EVERYONE ON ANOTHER SUCCESSFUL FLIGHT!!!

  3. Ronit Eklahare says:

    It’s good to see a falcon 9 land after all the starship flights!

    • V. Neto says:

      Like hitting a free throw or a lay up in basketball after missing a couple of 3 pointers. Sometimes all you need is to see that ball going through the net again.

    • AP May says:

      True, but a lot of people forget that before we had years where landing was routine, we had a bunch of crash landings of the Falcon boosters. 2013-2015 was a lot of fingers-crossed and disappointments hoping they’d land one. Starship will get there, they’re learning a lot quickly with those test flights.

    • Odysseus Rex says:

      @AP May Yeah, I know that, and you know that, what astonishes me though is all the people who actually think these flights have all been failures just because the landings have not been successful.

    • N W says:

      Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try again. Fail again. Fail better.

  4. Jack Whitlock says:

    You know you’re early when there’s no Flat Earthers

  5. Liam Robins says:

    Those landing views were so smooth.

  6. Devin Dykstra says:

    I think this is the first time we’ve seen a droneship landing from the perspective of the booster. Absolutely amazing!

  7. Finlay FinTGM says:

    That onboard Camera view of the first stage during landing was soo sick…

  8. Jeff Latimer says:

    (Note: No video from either stage until T +7.00)
    – 5:41 (T -13.17) Webcast Start
    – 12:08 (T -6.50) Introduction of the Inspiration 4, first all commercial space crew.
    – 14:35 (T -4.22) Strongback Retract
    – 16:06 (T -2.50) LOX Load Complete
    – 18:01 (T -0.57) Startup
    – 18:49 (T -0.10) 10 sec. Countdown
    – 18:59 (T -0.00) Liftoff
    – 20:21 (T +1.24) Max Q
    – 20:38 (T +1.42) “MVAC is Chillin'” (by request from @V. Neto)
    – 21:36 (T +2.39) MECO & Stage Separation
    – 21:53 (T +2.55) SES-1
    – 22:06 (T +3.09) Fairing Separation
    – 25:43 (T +6.45) Entry Burn
    – 26:04 (T +7.07) Video acquisition from both stages
    – 27:12 (T +8.14) Landing Burn
    – 27:30 (T +8.32) Landing Leg Deploy (Excellent video from 2nd Stage of the landing on the droneship “Of Course I Still Love You”!)
    – 27:57 (T +8.59) SECO-1
    – 28:08 (T +9.10) Stage 1 Nominal Orbital Insertion
    – 28:30 (T +9.33) End of first portion of webcast.
    – 1:03:08 (T +44.12) Begin second portion of webcast.
    – 1:04:51 (T +45.44) SES-2 & SECO-2 (this is a one sec. burn)
    – 1:05:18 (T +46.12) Confirm Orbital
    – 1:06:00 (T +46.53) End second portion of webcast.
    – 1:22:06 (T +1.03.00) Begin third portion of webcast.
    – 1:23:15 (T +1.04.11) Starlink Satellite Deploy
    – 1:24:01 (T +1.04.00) Webcast End

  9. Bart Guliker says:

    Sometimes it feels like technology is progressing slowly. Then you realize you’re watching a rocket live stream it’s landing on the internet and hear about satellites with ion thrusters. The future’s here indeed.

  10. SmoothMechanic says:

    This thing just went from Florida to Great Britain in exactly 20 minutes. I’d take that flight time any day

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