Did People Used To Look Older?

Did People Used To Look Older?

Join the Curiosity Box NOW and I’ll send you a bunch of free stuff! https://www.curiositybox.com/pages/vsauce

Follow me:

https://www.instagram.com/electricpants

Carl Sagan High School yearbook: https://www.loc.gov/resource/mss85590.041/?sp=2&r=-0.241,0,1.481,1.244,0

2001 Tiger Beat: https://allisontanenhaus.com/tiger-beat

Slade on Fabulous: https://i.pinimg.com/474x/23/b3/49/23b34988cc3958fb59cf66f0a15f9850.jpg

Elizabeth Taylor at 17: https://www.vintag.es/2018/04/elizabeth-taylor-by-philippe-halsman-1948.html

70s high school students: https://www.criticalpast.com/video/65675046349_students-and-navy_high-school-students_waste-of-money_interested-to-join

Brandon McCarthy tweet: https://twitter.com/bmccarthy32/status/1210350854571585537?lang=en

80s footballers: https://twitter.com/80sAging

80s high school IG: https://www.instagram.com/reel/CZcKEeJhUSy/?utm_source=ig_embed&ig_rid=4589a200-7096-44e8-b5e5-0324e5da78c9

Sunscreen commercial: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=krGctNSuSMI

Historical orthodontics: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Historical_orthodontics

Is 60 the new 50? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5897168/

Dua Lipa’s dad: https://twitter.com/lgbtdlipa/status/1377740115020283907

Face changes in magazines:

https://www.semanticscholar.org/paper/Changes-in-esthetic-standards-since-1940.-Berneburg-Dietz/d9f38e081f1dce3bde1dc758cf3e808a03cf7a73
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/9714286/#:~:text=The%20results%20showed%20that%20%281,lip%20curl%2C%20and%20vermilion%20display
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/10337246/

Norm 34 comparison tweet: https://twitter.com/Y2K_mindset/status/1412131747475509250

Norm edits: https://twitter.com/ziibiing/status/1412762456254992393

Golden Girls with modern style: https://www.tiktok.com/@sugacane22/video/7050305381406575919

Dale Irby: https://www.dallasnews.com/news/2013/06/30/richardson-teacher-s-retirement-ends-one-last-echo-of-disco-fashion/

Time traveling hipster:

https://www.communitystories.ca/v1/pm_v2.php?id=record_detail&fl=0&lg=English&ex=00000470&rd=117666#

Face-name matching effect:

https://www.apa.org/pubs/journals/releases/psp-pspa0000076.pdf

Bouba/kiki effect: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bouba/kiki_effect

Multiracial faces: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19065862/

Social bouba/kiki effect:

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28597194/
https://link.springer.com/article/10.3758/BF03194119

Dori Gray image: https://society6.com/product/dorian-gray-revisited_stretched-canvas

How old is old? https://agsjournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/jgs.17379

What age would you like to be?

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpsyg.2018.00067/full
https://theconversation.com/at-what-age-are-people-usually-happiest-new-research-offers-surprising-clues-156906

Black & white dreams:

http://www.faculty.ucr.edu/~eschwitz/SchwitzPapers/DreamB&W.pdf
http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.893.2832&rep=rep1&type=pdf

Mr. Stevens’ wardrobe: https://designerbrand.co/products/mcdonals-food?_pos=1&_sid=ae2ea94b3&_ss=r

music by Jake Chudnow
https://www.youtube.com/jakechudnow

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30 Responses

  1. Spyder says:

    Does this guy realise how much this generation needs people like him?

    • Randall Williams says:

      🤷🏻

    • Person Man Man says:

      Agreed, the value of these videos in education civilization and future generations is immaculate

    • Ρгοηαtoг тεηdoη says:

      @YourFeelingsAreFake I refuse to believe you’re as obtuse as you’re portraying here.

      I’m calling you out on the contrast of your name telling people their feelings are fake while you’re commenting based on nothing but feelings. It means you’re a hypocrite by definition

      Your words represent someone who doesn’t understand what epistemology even is and who has never challenged one of their significant beliefs that compose the foundation of their worldview.

  2. GimR's Lab says:

    Before I watch the video, I wonder if a lot of it has to do with the fact that our parents may have had similar hair styles and fashion in Highschool as they did when they raised us so we may subconsciously associate that with someone being old.

  3. The Composer Himself says:

    This is incredibly fascinating. When my mom was younger, people thought she was 25 when she was about half that age (she was in her last year of high school). Now she’s over 50 and she still looks like she’s 30-35. Her face changed a lot, but for some reason she doesn’t look much older now. I’m only 13 years old, but my parents say I look like a university student. I always doubted that because I have such a childish personality and I don’t even look that old. But I guess maybe they could be right. Anyways, thanks for this video, it really taught me something.

    • Ibrahim Ali says:

      Incredibly well put for someone who just became a teenager. As a teenager myself, it’s great that you can contribute to intellectual conversation in this way. Good comment.

    • HOLLA SOUNDS says:

      I’m 36 and look younger then this guy, probably because I dont have hair loss and cant grow facial hair.

  4. Rosie Leaverton says:

    I’ve always thought that hair, glasses, and things like that effected how “old” people looked back in the day. I’ve seen a highschool picture of my dad when he was 17 or 18, and the glasses he wore made him look much older… because they were similar to the glasses I’ve seen him wear all my life, as well as the ones in his wedding pictures with my mom. Him around my age looked like he does now, just with a trendier (for the times) haircut and a more youthful face.

  5. Nabalazs says:

    The part about seeing the seniors in high school hit way too close with me. I went to an 8 year highschool, so I looked up to the 9-12th graders as these mature old dudes. All tall and big. Then time sort of passed. And I never felt any closer to being in the state they seemed to be in. I never felt felt like I became them. Did they mature faster? Was I forever immature and childish? When I became a senior, I didnt see the freshmen as these tiny kids. I looked at them differently. The extreme gaps didnt seem so extreme. I was merely more experienced. Had more perspective perhaps.

  6. Ender says:

    I hope Vsauce knows how much of an impact he’s had on so many people in this generation. He’s truly a hero of YouTube 💖

  7. LittleRockSix says:

    I was actually a bit scared when i guessed Dan right after also correctly guessing the names of all the others.

    I’m european and have not grown up with these anglo-american names around me.
    Very uncanny feeling.

    My theory is that i’ve been exposed to these names through american culture/media in which characters have been named and/or been screenplayed by actors that have for the most part been subconsiously chosen by their look aswell as their occupational competence to fit their caracters names.

    • Emilie Coats says:

      I think I’ve been living outside of the US too long because I was like “dude looks like a Josef to me”, lol. All the Dan’s I’ve known (including my father-in-law and my nephew) are fairer in color, not by much, but definitely more light brown hair and lighter colored eyes

    • Person Man Man says:

      Same, I was bit surprised, because usually I don’t get these 100% right

    • Cedar says:

      I see a Joseph

    • Zachery says:

      I live in America and I got every one of them wrong lol

    • All Night Cats says:

      You should watch Chimamanda Adichie’s speach “The Dangers of a Single Story”. She does a wonderful job exploring this exact phenomenon and it’s effects on psyche.

  8. Pepperjack says:

    Something similar that fascinates me is how the technology of visual media has so far been so new to us that every age since its invention can be determined by us simply by the characteristics of the medium. Polaroids are obviously the 80s. B&W movies are from the 20s to the 50s. Daguerreotypes are from the 1800s. And because these times have now passed, our records of history LOOK like history, because that’s what we associate them with.

    But we may be living at a unique time in human history. Because right now we’ve more or less reached the quality of images looking like real life. Anything past this point will presumably see diminishing returns. Never more will old photos and videos look like old photos and videos aside from what they’re actually depicting. This means that people of the future could look at a picture that’s 500 years old, and yet it would look like the present. How will it affect our relationship with history when it looks like it could have happened yesterday?

    We’re so used to our history looking historical that it’s hard to imagine otherwise. But really, the time we’re in right now is the most unusual of all of humanity. Anything before the invention of the visual medium, and anything after its perfection, will be the norm.

  9. Yakub says:

    It’s not only about Michael’s incredible knowledge that has been fascinating me for years, but also his fantastic presentation of the topic he’s talking about. What a guy.

  10. Madamoizillion says:

    A note about fashion history, one could argue that before the 1950s (and this date is not a hard boundary) there wasn’t a strong sense of “teenage fashion”, as in, the clothes that were around were pretty much the same for adults and young people alike. By the 1950s and definitely the 1960s, there was an emergence of teen fashion and teen-specific culture that has mostly continued until today, with an interesting note that there may be some reversion of tween/teen fashion becoming adult-like again with the pervasiveness of influencer-based social media and the pandemic causing teens to consume more content from adults and less direct influence from their peers.

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